Blogging Assignment

Using WordPress, create a blog.  You must define your blog within one area of the arts (books, visual arts, music). If you would like, you may specify it even further (classical music, sculpture, poetry).

Create a blogroll by researching other blogs in the area. Include at least three of the “biggest,” most-read ones, and feel free to add lesser-known blogs that strike your fancy.  Aim for about 10 blogs.

To find the best blogs, check out the blogs related to major media outlets, such as theNew York Times’ Paper Cuts for books, for example. To get your research started, go to these sites and look at their blogrolls. Clicking on some of the links they include will lead you to other blogs with blogrolls, to other blogs with blogrolls, etc:

General:

http://www.aldaily.com/  (see weblogs)

Music:

http://www.saidthegramophone.com/

http://blogs.villagevoice.com/music/2010/12/music_critic_of.php

Books:

http://americanfiction.wordpress.com/

Film:

http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/

You must post twice a week, and posts should be at least 350 words.  The most important thing, of course, is that your blog is thoughtful, thought-through, informed by what others have written and display a distinctive voice.  Posts should be composed, not thrown up willy-nilly, though they need not be (nor should they be) as tight as an article, review or essay. Read others you like to gain a sense of tone, style and focus.  Your blog should give readers a sense of who you are—it should have a distinctive voice

These are not “class blogs” meant to be read by each other. They are public—for the world, particularly the world of other bloggers in the area. Do not write things like “in class today” or “Ms. Trubek asked us to…”. Make it real.

What to post? Write reviews, take up major ideas and trends in the area and opine about them, respond to news, reflect upon readings, comment upon posts by other bloggers, analyze the state of arts criticism today, etc.

One post must be an interview with a blogger. Contact someone you read and admire and consider how accessible that person is (i.e. Roger Ebert is a longshot, but you never know). Send them an email asking them if they would be willing to answer a few questions about why/how they blog, or another focused topic of your choice (but don’t just ask if you can “ask them about their blog”).  If they say yes, follow up with an email or a phone call. Write out your questions in advance. Make sure they are interesting questions, not generic ones. Give them a deadline for responding (deadlines help everyone!). If they do not respond by the deadline, send a follow-up, and then, if you do not hear anything, move on to someone else.

 

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